Concentration…a new collection

I’m pleased to announce that Concentration, my collection of holocaust stories, will be published by PS Publishing in November.  It will also contain an original story called “Trainspotting in Winesburg”, which is set in a future Australia.

In her introduction to the book, critic and scholar Marleen Barr writes:

In Jack Dann’s Holocaust visions, “imagination is used to enrich reality, not to escape from it.” His “invented, alternate worlds” are related to the ones Faulkner and Márquez create. But Yoknapatawpha and Macondo are not Jewish neighborhoods. Dann is a Faulkner and a Márquez for Jews. His fantastic retellings of the horror stories Nazis made real are “more truth than fantasy.”  Dann imbues the Holocaust with the fantastic to liberate it from the constraints of temporal reality and, via using writing as a time machine, transports it to the new light of present and future relevance.

Looking forward to November, as my showcase PS Australia collection Dreaming in the Dark will also be published.  This volume really shows off the extraordinary talent we have in Australia…and will truly be a showcase for the new PS Australia imprint. Oh, did I mention that I’m its MD? <Grin>

The Silent as audiobook…

The audiobook version of The Silent is out from Audible–I’ve just received the MP3-CD. It’s performed by Chris Kipiniak and is twelve hours and thirty-nine minutes long.  You can find it here.

As Audible describes the book:

“From the critically acclaimed author of The Memory Cathedral comes perhaps the most powerful, haunting, and unforgettable novel of the Civil War–or any war–ever written. Provocative, poetic, and disturbing, it introduces us to a young narrator, Mundy McDowell, whose voice rivals any in literature, bringing poignantly to life the surreal horrors of battle and its spiritual cost to human survival.

“Going Under”

I might start catching up on my website by going backwards (so what else is new?).  I’ve just sold “The Carbon Dreamer”, which Harlan Ellison had originally bought way back in the day for The Last Dangerous Visions, to the good folks at Cemetery Dance.  And Omni is back (hurrah!), which has featured my story “Going Under”.  You can find it at:

http://www.omnimagazine.com/archives/fiction/under/index.html

More as (and when) I can get my act together. <Grin>

Have a great weekend, everyone!

 

 

Jack’s signing at Reader’s Emporium for National Bookshop Day

I’ll be signing copies of The Rebel: Second Chance and talking (so what else is new) at Reader’s Emporium Book Store in Traralgon tomorrow (Saturday 8 August) from 11:00 am until 1:00 pm or thereabouts. The address is 121 Franklin Street, Traralgon, Victoria. Phone: 03 5176 4620.

If you’re in South Gippsland, stop over and say hello!

Cover The Rebel

Come to the launch at Supanova Sydney…

I meant to get this out earlier, but I’ve been flat-out with deadlines. Ah, what fun! Kevin J. Anderson, bless his generous heart, will be launching The Rebel: Second Chance at Supanova next week. Details: Sydney Showground, 1:15 pm on Saturday, June 20th at the Wrestling Ring. (No, they’re probably not going to make me wrestle!) If all goes according to plan, there will be James Dean and Marilyn Monroe look-alikes … and Jack and Kevin doing shtick. Hmm …

So, Sydney pals, if you’re around, I’d love to see you. Satalyte will have copies of the limited hardcover edition (we’re talking a BIG book here) and trade and ebook versions will be available. They will also have copies of the Reading the Entrails chapbook, which contains my Lucius Shepard interview and a very personal introduction.

Ah, I miss Lucius.

I’m flying into Sydney just for the day and will be at the Satalyte table. Stop and say hello.

Cheers, all!

#

From the preface to The Rebel: Second Chance:

This special edition of The Rebel is published in commemoration of James Dean’s death sixty years ago. My original working title for The Rebel was Second Chance, and it was my publisher’s idea to title this edition The Rebel: Second Chance; and, indeed, it is a second chance for this novel, as it explores in greater detail he lives of James Dean, Elvis Presley, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and the Kennedys in this, my alternate history of American pop culture. This version — with its greatly expanded scope — is meant to be a deeper meditation on the construction of myth and its creators.

I appreciate this opportunity to reveal my original conception, this rather large, fully painted canvass …

#

From the introduction to Reading the Entrails:

When we’re submerged in what I now think of as the ‘Green Years’ — that luminous time when everything was concentrated, when we rushed headlong shouting into what absolutely had to be an even grander future … that time when we were falling in love and doing such odd things as picking up refrigerators to express the joy and wonderment of it all (well, Lucius, fortified with Tequila, wanted to pick up my refrigerator after a night of falling in love) … that time when we were drunk stoned obsessed with the idea of writing and living and writing, when learning the craft was as exciting as parachuting out of airplanes, when fast friendships were made and the mundane, quiet days were merely inconvenient ellipses between adventures — when we’re living in those dilating supercharged times, we don’t consider (nor are we concerned) that we’re living history, albeit our personal history.

We’re too busy embracing experience, rushing forward, great locomotives speeding down the tracks of experience, until suddenly, suddenly we look at the gray face in the mirror and realize that we’ve arrived. We don’t necessarily know where we’ve arrived or what we’ve arrived at, but suddenly under lidded eyes we’re looking down those tracks, staring dumbly at what was and can never be again. And we know with some bizarre combination of shock and poignancy, that those green joys are over: oh, there are still joys, great geysers of the stuff; but those geysers are now taking place in a grayer, darker, shadowed time.

I found myself looking down those tracks on March 19th, 2014 when I found out that Lucius had died. I was — and am — in Australia, some 9,000 miles away from those green times; and when I heard the sad, obliterating news, I flashed through our shared past, remembering/reliving the good times, the bad times, selfishly grieving for my own loss of a dear friend; but also realizing that the world culture had just lost a white-hot, deadly penetrating, genius talent: the phenomenon known as Lucius Taylor Shepard …

 

The Rebel: Second Chance just out…

Satalyte Publishing has just published a special edition of my novel The Rebel in commemoration of James Dean’s death sixty years ago.

My original working title for The Rebel was Second Chance.

It was my publisher’s idea to title this edition The Rebel: Second Chance; and, indeed, it is a second chance for this novel, as it explores in greater detail the lives of James Dean, Elvis Presley, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and the Kennedys in this, my alternate history of American pop culture. This version—with its greatly expanded scope—is meant to be a deeper meditation on the construction of myth and its creators.

I appreciate this opportunity to reveal my original conception, this rather large, fully painted canvass…

You can order the book in hardcover, trade paper, or e-book format here:

http://satalyte.com.au/product/the-rebel-second-chance-jack-dann/

The Official Jack Dann website